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Injectable Composite Material Designed for Better Plastic Surgery

News   May 03, 2019 | Original story from John Hopkins Medicine

 
Injectable Composite Material Designed for Better Plastic Surgery

Two tissue defects were created at each side of the inguinal fat pat. Hydrogels of 80- and 150-Pa, and composite of 150-Pa with the same volume of 1 mL were injected into the defect, respectively. Hydrogels showed transparent whereas composite looked white. At POD 42, hydrogels and composite integrated well with the host tissue. It is hard to differentiate injected materials with the host tissue; even we could identify the material location by suture knots, which were marked after the initial injection (View from top). When lifted up the whole inguinal fat pat, we could identify the injected materials (View from bottom). The composite exhibited the similar shape retention as the 150-Pa hydrogel at POD 42, which was larger than the 80-Pa hydrogel. Scale bar = 10 mm. Credit: Johns Hopkins University and Johns Hopkins Medicine

 
 
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