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Functional Insulin-producing Cells Grown in Lab

News   Feb 04, 2019 | Original story by Nicholas Weiler, University of California San Francisco

 
Mimicking Clustering of Immature Beta Cells Yields Stem Cell Breakthrough

Left: Clusters of pancreatic beta cells derived from human pluripotent stem cells in a lab dish. Insulin producing cells are labeled in green. Red indicates the presence of PDX1, a key protein involved in insulin production. Right: When islet cells generated from human stem cells in the lab are transplanted into mice, they form clusters and begin to produce the three key blood sugar–regulating hormones generated by normal pancreatic islets. Green cells are insulin-producing beta cells, red cells are glucagon-producing alpha cells, and blue cells are somatostatin-producing delta cells. Credit: Hebrok Lab / UCSF

 
 
 

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