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Riboxx and CNBG Initiate a Collaboration
News

Riboxx and CNBG Initiate a Collaboration

Riboxx and CNBG Initiate a Collaboration
News

Riboxx and CNBG Initiate a Collaboration

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Riboxx Pharmaceuticals GmbH (Riboxx) and China National Biotec Group Company Limited (CNBG) have announced that they have initiated a research collaboration to evaluate Riboxxim®, a TLR3 agonist from Riboxx, with an antigen of CNBG against one of the world’s deadliest infectious diseases.

During the term of the research collaboration, Riboxx will provide access to Riboxxim® to enable CNBG to perform an evaluation in conjunction with CNBG’s antigen against the disease target.

Dr. Jacques Rohayem, CEO of Riboxx said: “We are delighted to initiate this collaboration with CNBG, which is one of the leading developers of vaccines against serious infectious diseases. Our TLR3 agonist has the potential to increase the efficacy of the antigen and provide a safe but highly effective immune response against the disease.”

Xie Guilin, Vice President of CNBG said: “The collaboration with Riboxx is designed to evaluate the potential of Riboxxim as an effective adjuvant to enhance the performance of our antigen. This combination has the potential to deliver effective immunization against a deadly disease that is inadequately treated at present.”

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