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Zika Vaccine Trials Provide Promising Results

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News

Zika Vaccine Trials Provide Promising Results

This is Sarah George, M.D., associate professor of infectious diseases, allergy and immunology at Saint Louis University. Credit: Saint Louis University
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In early results published in The Lancet, researchers report that an investigational Zika vaccine was well-tolerated and stimulated potentially protective immune responses in three Phase 1 clinical trials, one of which was conducted at Saint Louis University. More than 90 percent of study volunteers in the 3 trials who received the investigational vaccine demonstrated an immune response to Zika virus.

Spread primarily by Aedes mosquitoes and also by sexual contact, Zika infection of pregnant women can put babies at risk of developing microcephaly, characterized by underdeveloped heads and brain damage, and other serious health issues.

An investigational vaccine against the virus, called ZPIV (Zika Purified Inactivated Vaccine), was developed by the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (WRAIR), in partnership with the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA), part of the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response (ASPR), both at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS).

The three placebo-controlled, double-blind trials were designed to address different questions researchers wanted to answer about the immune responses elicited by the investigational vaccine.

The SLU study continues its enrollment, examining how three different vaccine doses compare in terms of safety and ability to stimulate an immune response. A trial conducted by WRAIR is examining the impact of priming the immune system with either a licensed yellow fever or Japanese encephalitis vaccine followed by ZPIV vaccination. Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) is evaluating three dosing schedules of ZPIV.

Principal investigator of the SLU trial Sarah George, M.D., is encouraged by the study findings.

"I'm happy to see our work help make progress toward a vaccine against Zika," said George, who is associate professor of infectious diseases, allergy, and immunology at Saint Louis University. "We need a vaccine to protect people from this emerging infectious disease that can cause microcephaly and other severe brain defects in babies."

This article has been republished from materials provided by Saint Louis University. Note: material may have been edited for length and content. For further information, please contact the cited source.

Reference

Modjarrad, K., Lin, L., George, S. L., Stephenson, K. E., Eckels, K. H., Barrera, R. A., . . . Michael, N. L. (2017). Preliminary aggregate safety and immunogenicity results from three trials of a purified inactivated Zika virus vaccine candidate: phase 1, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials. The Lancet. doi:10.1016/s0140-6736(17)33106-9

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