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GenNext Technologies and NeoProteomics Announce an Alliance in Biomolecular Footprinting
Product News

GenNext Technologies and NeoProteomics Announce an Alliance in Biomolecular Footprinting

GenNext Technologies and NeoProteomics Announce an Alliance in Biomolecular Footprinting
Product News

GenNext Technologies and NeoProteomics Announce an Alliance in Biomolecular Footprinting

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GenNext Technologies (GenNext) and NeoProteomics (Neo) have joined forces to advance biomolecular footprinting know-how and utility in biopharmaceutical and structural biology research. Neo is a company specializing in footprinting software and services for biopharmaceutical and structural biology research. GenNext is a provider of footprinting instruments, software, and accessories that enable higher order structural analysis in a compact, intuitively simple, benchtop format.

Together, both companies are developing an informative website dedicated to facilitating the rapid exchange of scholarly content and discourse among researchers working in pharmaceutical and biopharmaceutical development as well as structural biological studies. This website will also provide understandable application examples so scientists and decision makers in the field can immediately grasp the impact of protein footprinting upon their research.

As a next step in educating the community, the companies have announced an upcoming webinar series to disseminate footprinting know-how and highlight its applied value in biopharmaceutical and structural biology research. Five, one-hour information packed webinars are planned to be presented by leaders in the biomolecular footprinting field, including: Professor Mark Chance (Case Western Reserve University), Professor Michael Gross (Washington University, St. Louis), Professor Joshua Sharp (University of Mississippi), and Professor Lisa Jones (University of Maryland Baltimore).

“We are excited to launch this alliance with NeoProteomics,” remarked Scot Weinberger, President and CEO of GenNext Technologies. “In academic studies, footprinting has provided valuable information by exposing monoclonal antibody defects, elucidating biosimilar failure and storage induced defects, and facilitating the study of orthosteric and allosteric drug-target interactions and protein conformational change. Until now, footprinting has been scantly applied in biopharma due to the inherent complexities of the technique and the absence of facile and reliable commercial products. GenNext provides biopharmas with the world’s first dedicated instrumentation and software products for biopharmaceutical higher order structural studies, which exploit the analytical power of biomolecular footprinting.”

“We too are pleased to align with GenNext Technologies to launch and promote this educational platform.” said John Schenkel, Jr., President and CEO of NeoProteomics. “Over the past few years, we’ve worked with our biotechnology clients and collaborators to demonstrate that protein footprinting is a very precise and versatile biophysical technique, which provides highly significant and actionable data. What’s most exciting however, is the introduction of new technologies which make Protein Footprinting much more accessible. We feel very strongly that by utilizing Protein Footprinting, researchers will be better equipped to attack human disease.”

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