Curing Cancer With Our Immune System

Video   Dec 05, 2017 | Original Video from the University of Southampton


Professor Peter Johnson - Professor of Medical Oncology, University of Southampton and Chief Clinician for Cancer Research UK.

Professor Johnson qualified in medicine from the University of Cambridge, trained in medical oncology at St Bartholomew’s Hospital in London and was Senior Lecturer in the Cancer Centre at Leeds, UK. His research interests are in applied immunology and immunotherapy, lymphoma biology and clinical trials. He is Chief Investigator for clinical trials ranging from first in human novel antibody therapeutics to international randomised studies, and for the Cancer Research UK Stratified Medicine Programme. He is a member of the board of the UK Clinical Research Collaboration and the Cancer Immunotherapy Consortium, and a Trustee of the UK National Cancer Research Institute.

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