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What Is Science Telling Us About Soil Testing and Treatment?

Article

Just as soil testing is important to the farmer, working to improve upon current soil testing methods is important to the agricultural scientist. By ensuring that farmers and agricultural workers have access to the best possible soil testing tools, they will then be more able to protect and improve the health of their land as needed.

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Bacterial Culture

Infographic

There are lots of reasons to culture bacteria, many sources from which to culture them and diverse species with equally diverse growth requirements – some pickier than others. To give yourself a fighting chance at successful bacterial culture it is therefore vital to pick the correct culture conditions for your purpose and avoid contamination by using good aseptic technique.

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Food Authenticity and Spectroscopy

List

You may have certainly enjoyed an authentic honey, wine, or olive oil. Yet, each of these foods are at risk for fraud. To mitigate and investigate food fraud, researchers use analytical methods, such as spectroscopy, to analyze the constituents of food.

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British Columbia’s HPV Vaccination Program Reduces Cervical Pre-cancer Rates by > 50%

News

British Columbia’s school-based human papillomavirus (HPV) immunization program is reducing rates of cervical pre-cancer in B.C. women, according to a new study.

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Why Tumor Cells Invade Distant Organs
News

Most cancers kill because tumor cells spread beyond the primary site to invade other organs. Now, a USC study of brain-invading breast cancer cells circulating in the blood reveals they have a molecular signature indicating specific organ preferences.

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A New Way of Finding Cancer-causing Germs
News

Researchers have pioneered a new way of finding bacteria and viruses linked to cancer, by harnessing genomic data.

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Triple-negative Breast Cancer Influenced by Dual Action of Genes and RNA
News

Women with triple-negative breast cancer could be differentiated from a more common form of the disease by a panel of 17 small RNA molecules.

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Testing Medicines After Brexit: Upholding High QC Standards for Pharmaceuticals
Article

Maintaining robust quality control standards is a key priority for any commercial industry – but for pharmaceutical manufacturers, it can literally be a matter of life and death. The looming Brexit deadline is likely to be seen as a pivotal moment by those operating in the sector. The prospect of the UK leaving the European Union, and the jurisdiction of the EU’s unified single market for medicine regulation, is creating considerable uncertainty for drugmakers.

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Francis Mojica: The Modest Microbiologist Who Discovered and Named CRISPR
Article

Kicking off Technology Networks Explores the CRISPR Revolution, Professor Mojica, or "Francis", takes us on a journey back to the original research that, despite being deemed "crazy" by members of the scientific community at the time, led to the CRISPR revolution that is anticipated to edit evolution forever.

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Who Is Responsible for Reproducible Science?
Article

Reproducibility is now recognized as a core feature of good scientific practice but too many papers fail to meet the grade. We talked to Leslie D McIntosh, CEO of Ripeta, on the topic of reproducibility. In this interview, we ask Leslie about the concepts within Ripeta’s recent report on the state of reproducible science in 2019.

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Feeling Like a Fraud: Impostor Syndrome in STEM
Article

Impostor syndrome is experienced by millions of people around the world cross culturally, and describes difficulty internalizing one's accomplishments or abilities, and instead attributing their success to other factors. In this article, we explore the prevalence of impostor syndrome in STEM and the impact it has on the scientific community.

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Essential Amino Acids: Chart, Abbreviations and Structure
Article

Amino acids are the building blocks that form polypeptides and ultimately proteins. Consequently, they are fundamental components of our bodies and vital for physiological functions such as protein synthesis, tissue repair and nutrient absorption. Here we take a closer look at amino acid properties, how they are used in the body and where they come from.

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Living in the (Bio)material World: A Night at Biodesign Here Now
Article

We report the opening night of Biodesign Here Now, an event featuring architects, artists, textile designers, and many more creatives who have found ways to bring together biology and design in their work, showing a way forward for collaboration between the two fields.

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