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Latest Editor's Pics

Editor's Pics

Modeling Infertility in Flies

Researchers have identified a gene that plays an important role in fertility across multiple species. Pictured is a normal fruit fly ovary (left) and a fruit fly ovary with this gene dialed down (right).
Editor's Pics

Transplanted Pancreatic Islet Cells

This image shows transplanted pancreatic islet cells in which insulin is shown in red, the cell nucleus in blue, and the blood vessels in aqua.
Editor's Pics

How Do Flies Attach to Objects?

This is an electron micrograph of the fly foot. The adhesive spatula-shaped setae (light-blue structures) allow the fly to attach itself to objects.
Editor's Pics

Sweet-Toothed Cells

Inside the ovary of the fruit fly, sex cells divide, multiply and grow to become mature eggs. A new study shows that this normal physiological process causes female fruit flies to develop a preference for sugar.
Editor's Pics

Lung Cancer on a Chip

Lung cancer cells (green) grow within healthy lung tissue (red) in the lung cancer chip, used to model and study how tumors grow.
Editor's Pics

Rainbow Brain

A computer-generated multi-color image of a brain based on data from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).
Editor's Pics

Fly Glial Cells With Extra Genome Copies

These images show glial cells of the optic chiasm in the adult fly brain that have accumulated extra genome copies.
Editor's Pics

Nematode Worm Nerve Cells Fusing Together

In the study during which this image was taken, nematode worms were engineered to express fusogens in their neurons. These nerve cells fused together, causing behavioral impairments.
Editor's Pics

Peripheral Sensory Neuron

Confocal micrograph of a peripheral sensory neuron in culture. Marker stains and antibodies are used to identify neurons (red), c-Fos protein (green) and nuclei (blue).
Editor's Pics

Mitochondria and Cell Fate

In these images, we can see human progenitor cells with their DNA-containing nucleus colored red after division and their mitochondria labeled in green.
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