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Immune Cells Put Into Gear by Molecular "Clutch"

News   Jul 23, 2019 | Original story by the University of Warwick for the National Centre for Biological Sciences.

 
Immune Cells Put Into Gear by Molecular "Clutch"

The composition of LAT clusters changes on its travel towards the center leading to changes in their binding to the actin network: in the distal supramolecular activation cluster (D-SMAC) zone, LAT clusters contain Nck and WASP and bind strongly to actin network leading to their transport together with the actin retrograde flow; at the transition to the peripheral SMAC, characterized by concentric organized acto-myosin arcs, LAT clusters loose Nck and WASP leading to a weaker interaction with actin allowing them to be swept towards the central SMAC by the radially constricting acto-myosin arcs. Credit: Dr. Darius Köster, University of Warwick.

 
 
 

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