We've updated our Privacy Policy to make it clearer how we use your personal data.

We use cookies to provide you with a better experience. You can read our Cookie Policy here.

Advertisement
Patients’ Immune System May Impact Cancer Immunotherapy
News

Patients’ Immune System May Impact Cancer Immunotherapy

Patients’ Immune System May Impact Cancer Immunotherapy
News

Patients’ Immune System May Impact Cancer Immunotherapy

Read time:
 

Want a FREE PDF version of This News Story?

Complete the form below and we will email you a PDF version of "Patients’ Immune System May Impact Cancer Immunotherapy "

First Name*
Last Name*
Email Address*
Country*
Company Type*
Job Function*
Would you like to receive further email communication from Technology Networks?

Technology Networks Ltd. needs the contact information you provide to us to contact you about our products and services. You may unsubscribe from these communications at any time. For information on how to unsubscribe, as well as our privacy practices and commitment to protecting your privacy, check out our Privacy Policy

Higher or lower levels of certain immune cells in cancer patients may be associated with how well they respond to immunotherapy, according to preliminary results of a study conducted by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI).

 

The findings will be presented today at the AACR Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C., by Robert Ferris, M.D., Ph.D., UPMC Endowed Professor, chief of the Division of Head and Neck Surgery, and co-leader of the Cancer Immunology Program at UPCI.

 

The research was an extension of the recently completed CheckMate 141 Phase III clinical trial co-chaired by Dr. Ferris, which showed that the immunotherapy nivolumab significantly increases survival and causes fewer adverse side effects in patients with recurrent head and neck cancer.

 

However, the treatment was not equally effective in all the patients so Dr. Ferris and his team aimed to find out whether differences in the patients’ immune system profiles could be associated with better response to immunotherapy.

 

The researchers found that higher levels of tumor-associated immune cells (TAICs) expressing the PD-L1 protein were associated with longer overall survival and greater likelihood of response to the drug nivolumab. TAICs are immune cells that have infiltrated the tumor and are thought to play an important role in tumor growth.

 

In blood samples taken prior to the start of immunotherapy, the researchers also found that patients with higher levels of circulating CD8, or cytotoxic, T cells—also known as killer T cells—and lower levels of regulatory T cells were associated with better response to treatment.

 

“Our study shows that immune cells in the microenvironment around the tumor could play a critical role in how patients respond to immunotherapy. By determining the nature of these cells and how they are affected by treatments, we may be able to significantly improve the effectiveness of current therapies and help a greater number of patients,” said Dr. Ferris.


This article has been republished from materials provided by University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences. Note: material may have been edited for length and content. For further information, please contact the cited source.
Advertisement