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Silica Sponges Stimulate the Immune System

News   Apr 22, 2021 | Original story from Université de Genève

 
Silica Sponges Stimulate the Immune System

Confocal microscope image of immune cells (in red). In green, silica nanoparticles. The nanoparticles, once absorbed by the immune cells, appear in yellow. Credit: UNIGE, Carole Bourquin

 
 
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