We've updated our Privacy Policy to make it clearer how we use your personal data.

We use cookies to provide you with a better experience, read our Cookie Policy

Advertisement

Fighting Cancer on Two Fronts

Video   Apr 24, 2019 | Taken from TEDx Talks, YouTube

 

Nia Clements is a cancer researcher who has found a potential treatment to multiple forms of cancer. What's more, is she did all of this before even graduating high school.

Cancer, in more ways than one, has played an influential role in her life. In this talk, she delves into her personal journey, which all started because of a rat named sniffles.

Nia Clements is a first-year student at Trinity University. By the ripe old age of 18, Nia has conducted pioneering cancer research with EISO (East Indian Sandalwood oil) through which she's discovered a potential treatment to stomach and throat cancer.

As a consequence of her research, she's competed in and won the International Science and Engineering fair, been featured on Smore magazine, and presented her work at the White House, where she spoke about her research with Vice President Biden, Bill Nye, and Adam Savage.

This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. 

 
More Information
 
 
Advertisement
 

Recommended Videos

Teach Me in 10 – Food as Medicine With Dr William W. Li

Video

In this episode of Teach Me in 10 Dr William W. Li discusses the relationship between food, health and disease and shares several examples of foods that have been shown to support the immune system.

WATCH NOW

Teach Me in 10 – Cancer, Evolution and the Science of Life With Dr Kat Arney

Video

In this installment of Teach Me in 10 we're joined by the award-winning science writer, broadcaster and public speaker Dr Kat Arney. Where did cancer come from, where is it going and how might we beat it? Dr Arney explains all in less than 10 minutes.

WATCH NOW

Why Don't Elephants Get Cancer?

Video

A study led by the Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah could explain why elephants rarely get cancer.

WATCH NOW

 

To personalize the content you see on Technology Networks homepage, Log In or Subscribe for Free

LOGIN SUBSCRIBE FOR FREE