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Adipose-Derived Stem and Regenerative Cells Improve Fat Graft Retention in Preclinical Study
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Adipose-Derived Stem and Regenerative Cells Improve Fat Graft Retention in Preclinical Study

Adipose-Derived Stem and Regenerative Cells Improve Fat Graft Retention in Preclinical Study
News

Adipose-Derived Stem and Regenerative Cells Improve Fat Graft Retention in Preclinical Study

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Cytori Therapeutics, Inc. reported positive preclinical results demonstrating adipose-derived stem and regenerative cells improved the quality and long-term retention of a fat graft, representing a potential new approach in reconstructive surgery.

The benefit of adipose-derived stem and regenerative cells was observed at six months and was retained through the end of the study at nine months. Results were presented at the 30th annual San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium.

"Fat tissue transfers enhanced with adipose tissue-derived stem and regenerative cells can provide a novel option for reconstructive surgery," said Marc H. Hedrick, M.D., president of Cytori Therapeutics.

"Using Cytori's Celution™ System to provide stem and regenerative cells would simplify, standardize and improve the predictability of shape and volume outcomes for fat transfer procedures, including breast reconstruction following partial mastectomy."

In the preclinical rodent study, donor adipose-derived stem and regenerative cells, or saline, was combined with donor adipose tissue and then transplanted onto recipient skulls. After six and nine months, grafts were harvested and weighed. The mean weight of cell-enhanced grafts at six and nine months was two times greater than grafts with saline (p = 0.019 at six months; p=0.034 at nine months).

Histological analysis revealed the cell-enhanced grafts contained less fibrous tissue, suggesting improved graft quality. Additionally, donor stem and regenerative cells were present within grafted adipose tissue and were incorporated into blood vessel walls within the fat graft.

A related preclinical study further established safety of adipose-derived stem and regenerative cells by demonstrating these cells had no effect on the promotion of tumor growth. Human fat grafts with or without adipose-derived stem and regenerative cells were transplanted onto mammary fad pads of rodent recipients injected with human breast cancer cells.

The study was repeated with three human fat donors. After eight weeks, the study found no evidence that enhancing the fat graft of any of the donors with stem and regenerative cells had any effect on the in vivo growth rate, volume, or metastasis of the human breast tumors.

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