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DNA Jiggling Motion in Bacteria Halted Before Cell Death

News   Jan 11, 2019 | Original story by Eric Hamilton, University of Wisconsin-Madison

 
Antimicrobial Peptides Freeze Cytoplasmic Motion, Render Bacteria Susceptible to Attack

The tracks of dozens of individual ribosomes, which build proteins in cells, that were identified from a single bacterial cell using a microscopic technique that can follow the movement of individual molecules in living cells. This technique showed that the antimicrobial peptide LL-37 stops the movement of ribosomes when it enters cells. Image credit: James Weisshaar

 
 
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