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Functioning Stem Cells Improve Success of Ocular Surface Reconstruction with Amniotic Membrane
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Functioning Stem Cells Improve Success of Ocular Surface Reconstruction with Amniotic Membrane

Functioning Stem Cells Improve Success of Ocular Surface Reconstruction with Amniotic Membrane
News

Functioning Stem Cells Improve Success of Ocular Surface Reconstruction with Amniotic Membrane

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Despite a high failure rate, amniotic membrane transplantation can be effective for ocular surface reconstructions, particularly in cases with functioning stem cells, according to researchers in England.

V. Senthil Maharajan, FRCS(Ed), and colleagues at University of Nottingham reviewed outcomes of 74 amniotic membrane transplantation procedures performed in 58 consecutive patients. Of these, 32 procedures were performed in cases with stem cell loss (group A), 24 were performed in cases without stem cell loss (group B) and 18 were performed for conjunctival reconstruction (group C).

The researchers reported "unequivocal success" in 22% of group A, 62.5% of group B and 50% of group C. In group A, acute and subacute cases required more procedures vs. chronic cases. In group C, results were comparatively worse when surgery was used in progressive cicatrizing conditions, according to the study.

The study is published in the March issue of Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology

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