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Geron Scientists Demonstrate Improved Heart Function Using Embryonic Stem Cells in Mice
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Geron Scientists Demonstrate Improved Heart Function Using Embryonic Stem Cells in Mice

Geron Scientists Demonstrate Improved Heart Function Using Embryonic Stem Cells in Mice
News

Geron Scientists Demonstrate Improved Heart Function Using Embryonic Stem Cells in Mice

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Geron Corporation reported its scientists and collaborators have demonstrated that human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived cardiomyocytes improve heart function when transplanted after myocardial infarction.

Published online Aug. 26 in Nature Biotechnology, the study is the first to document the potential clinical utility of regenerating damaged heart muscle by injecting hESC-derived cardiomyocytes directly into the site of the infarct.

In addition, the research confirms the effectiveness of a scalable production system that enables Geron to manufacture the cardiomyocytes for use in ongoing large animal studies and, ultimately, testing in humans.

The study describes the feeder- and serum-free, scalable production of hESC-derived cardiomyocytes, their survival in the infarct zone of rats when transplanted four days after infarction, and echocardiographic and MRI evidence of significant improvement in cardiac structure and contractile function. Geron’s scientists conducted the study in collaboration with Charles Murry, M.D., Ph.D., and Michael Laflamme, M.D., Ph.D., at the University of Washington.

“This is one of the most important publications on hESCs for Geron to date,” said Thomas B. Okarma, Ph.D., M.D., Geron’s president and chief executive officer. “Our cardiomyocytes are the first human cardiac cells shown to survive after injection into an infarcted ventricle and to produce significant improvement in heart function. hESCs are the only cell type shown definitively to form cardiomyocytes.”

“We’re developing our cardiomyocyte product, GRNCM1, to address the large unmet need in heart failure,” Dr. Okarma added. “We expect GRNCM1 to be our second hESC-derived cell type to enter clinical development.”

Production and Characterization of hESC-derived Cardiomyocytes: In the study, researchers produced human cardiomyocytes from hESCs using a sequential, directed differentiation protocol that did not rely on serum or feeder cells. The procedure was scalable with each hESC producing approximately three human cardiomyocytes.

After final enrichment, greater than 80% of the cells were cardiomyocytes. The hESC-derived cardiomyocytes displayed surface and intracellular markers, as well as electrophysiologic and pharmacologic properties consistent with human cardiomyocytes, the majority of which represented ventricular cardiomyocytes.

Engraftment Following Transplantation: To enable survival in the heart, the hESC-derived cardiomyocytes were suspended in a cocktail of survival factors that had been experimentally determined to dramatically enhance cell survival after injection into the infarcted ventricular wall.

Four weeks later, tissue sections from the infarcted hearts were examined for the presence of the human cells. The vast majority of human cardiomyocytes were localized in the central region of the infarct, suggesting that the cells were capable of engraftment in the hostile environment of the infarct zone.

Moreover, a portion of the cardiomyocytes was mitotic after injection, possibly enhancing their regenerative efficiency. The grafts also induced a brisk, host-derived angiogenic response: all the implants contained numerous capillaries lined with rat endothelial cells.

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