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How Bacteria Control Their Cell Cycle

News   Jan 06, 2020 | Original story from the University of Basel

 
How Bacteria Control Their Cell Cycle

Time lapse of E. coli bacteria growing in a microfluidic device, with DNA replication origins visualised as red spots. Credit: Biozentrum, University of Basel

 
 
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