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Optimized Cryopreservation of Mouse Sperm Based on Fertilization Rate
News

Optimized Cryopreservation of Mouse Sperm Based on Fertilization Rate

Optimized Cryopreservation of Mouse Sperm Based on Fertilization Rate
News

Optimized Cryopreservation of Mouse Sperm Based on Fertilization Rate

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Abstract

Although procedures for in vitro fertilization with cryopreserved sperm have been published there is a lack of data indicating that the cryoprotectant and cryopreservation procedures used for those procedures were optimal. To redress this, fertilization rate of eggs exposed to sperm in vitro was used as the outcome in the optimization of raffinose concentration in the cryoprotectant (raffinose in water), volume of cryoprotectant, and freezing conditions for C57BL/6J mouse sperm. Sperm were frozen in a cylindrical Dewar with an internal diameter and height of 14.0 cm and 36.0 cm respectively. The optimal concentration of raffinose was 23-24% (510-540 mOsm/kg). The optimal volume of cryoprotectant used to prepare the sperm suspension from a single mouse was 180-400 µl, and sperm proved most fertile when frozen 13-25 mm above liquid nitrogen. Raffinose in the fertilization medium did not inhibit fertilization. Fertilized eggs transferred to oviducts of recipient mice developed into viable offspring.

The article is published in the Journal of Reproduction and Development and is free to access.

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