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Elucidating Early Events of Germ Cell Development

News   Oct 04, 2018 | Story from the University of Edinburgh

 
Transcription Roadblock Limits Entry of Epiblast Cells to the Germline

Scanning electron micrograph of a 6 day old human embryo beginning to implant into the lining of the uterus (endometrium). As implantation progresses, the inner cell mass begins to form into the bilaminar disc. The two layers are called the epiblast and the hypoblast. An embryo that has been in culture for up to 14 days will remain at this stage of development. Such cultured embryos remain alive but do not progress as they would in the womb. Credit: Yorgos Nikas, Wellcome Images, Cell Image Library.

 
 
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