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Stem Cell Sciences Launches Stem Cell Media Based on Understanding of ES Cell Self-Renewal
Product News

Stem Cell Sciences Launches Stem Cell Media Based on Understanding of ES Cell Self-Renewal

Stem Cell Sciences Launches Stem Cell Media Based on Understanding of ES Cell Self-Renewal
Product News

Stem Cell Sciences Launches Stem Cell Media Based on Understanding of ES Cell Self-Renewal


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Stem Cell Sciences plc has announced the launch of Culticell iSTEM, a novel, serum-free, feeder-free embryonic stem (ES) cell research media product that maintains cells in their basal, pluripotent state. Culticell iSTEM provides researchers with a purer starting point for investigating the biological potential of ES cells.

The development of Culticell iSTEM was based on pioneering work of Professor Austin Smith, a scientific founder of SCS, and his team at The Wellcome Trust Centre for Stem Cell Research, Cambridge University (UK), and which was published in the journal Nature (Vol. 453, No.7194).

Professor Smith’s research found that self-renewal properties of ES cells are innate and can be maintained by providing a neutralized culture environment, without needing to add external stimulation from cytokines and growth factors.

Since mouse ES cells were first described more than 26 years ago, they have been cultured and derived using combinations of feeder cells, cytokines, growth factors, hormones and serum. Prof Smith’s research suggests these additives were shielding the true nature of the ES cells and are not required to maintain pluripotency.

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