SPEDs: Self-powered, Paper-based Electrochemical Devices

Video

The self-powered, paper-based electrochemical devices, or SPEDs, are designed for sensitive diagnostics at the “point-of-care,” or when care is delivered to patients, in regions where the public has limited access to resources or sophisticated medical equipment.

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Microfluidics for Single Cell Analysis of CTCs

Article

Here we take a look at the use of microfluidic devices in the isolation and analysis of circulating tumor cells.

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First FDA Approval for NGS-based Companion Diagnostic

Blog

To learn about some of the challenges met in achieving FDA approval, the advantages the test offers, and how its use can benefit non-small cell lung cancer patients, we spoke to Joydeep Goswami, president of Clinical Next Generation Sequencing and Oncology at Thermo Fisher Scientific.

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The Role of AI in Pathology

Article

We spoke to David West Jr. to learn about the role that digital pathology software can play in the lab, the benefits it can bring, and what the future may hold for pathology.

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Self-powered, Paper-based Electrochemical Devices Developed for POC Diagnostics

Self-powered, Paper-based Electrochemical Devices Developed for POC Diagnostics

News

The new paper-based diagnostic device detects biomarkers and identifies diseases by performing electrochemical analyses, and the assays change color to indicate specific test results.

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Blood Test Predicts Prostate Tumor Resistance
News

A new blood test developed by researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) can predict drug resistance in patients with advanced prostate cancer.

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New Test for Rare Immunodeficiency
News

Researchers at the University of Basel have developed a test to quickly and reliably diagnose a rare and severe immune defect, hepatic veno-occlusive disease with immunodeficiency.

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Using Saliva to Diagnose Zika
News

By analyzing the saliva of a pregnant mother infected with Zika and her twins, researchers were able to pinpoint the specific protein signature for Zika that is present in saliva, creating potential to use this signature as an effective way to screen for exposure.

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