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10 Things We Didn't Know Last Week – 10 May 2019

List

A wrap-up of the biggest science news from the last 7 days.

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Antimicrobial Resistance: Drivers, Diagnostics and DNA

List

Combating AMR is going to take coordinated action of different approaches, such as improved public education and national action plans, greater surveillance, improved diagnostics, and the ability to harness advances in genomics and big data.

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Releasing the Handbrake on Exosome Applications

Blog

Despite the great excitement about exosomes and their huge diagnostic and therapeutic potential, the technology needed to advance this work is lacking. We spoke to Jim West, CEO of Clara Biotech, who tells us how his team is working to fill that gap.

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Mass Spectrometry is Advancing Cancer Research in Leaps and Bounds

Article

From picking out cancerous tissue areas during diagnosis, to uncovering novel biomarkers of early detection, mass spectrometry has become an indispensable analytical technique in cancer research.

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“Fainting Gene” Is Identified for the First Time
News

Fainting is not solely caused by external factors. Your genes also play a part. In a study looking at data from more than 400,000 individuals, scientists have identified the first gene that predisposes to fainting.

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Huge Data Set Offers New Insights for Predicting Huntington Disease Age of Onset
News

Scientists have examined more than 25 years of data to reveal new insights into predicting the age of onset for Huntington disease.

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Single-cell Analysis Opens Doors for Targeted Treatment in Autism Spectrum Disorder
News

Researchers have adopted single-cell analysis to uncover the molecular underpinnings of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Their findings may have implications for targeted therapeutics.

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Specialized Microscope Scans and Closes Single Blood Vessels
News

If further developed, this specialized microscope could be revolutionary for the treatment of skin cancer, as it enables incredibly precise surgery – all without cutting skin.

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Single-cell Sequencing Creates “Molecular Map” of Alzheimer’s Disease
News

A research team set out to identify the unique sets of genes that are turned on, or expressed, during Alzheimer’s in every major cell type in the prefrontal cortex.

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Flu Virus’ Best Friend: Low Humidity
News

Yale researchers have pinpointed a key reason why people are more likely to get sick and even die from flu during winter months: low humidity.

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The First Winners of the LEA
Article

The Lipidomics Excellence Award (LEA) was founded to strengthen life sciences through lipidomics. After reviewing the many high-quality submitted projects, the LEA jury has announced the three awardees.

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The Evolution of Proteomics - Dr Evangelia Petsalaki
Article

Dr Evangelia Petsalaki is a Group Leader at the European Bioinformatics Group, where her research team study human cell signaling in health and disease conditions. Collaborating with teams specializing in MS, imaging and cell biology, their aim is to make both predictive and conditional models so they can anticipate what might happen in a biological network under different conditions.

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Whole-Exome Sequencing at the Dawn of Personalized Medicine
Article

Deciphering the first complete sequence of the human genome in 2003 required a combined effort of scientists from 20 institutions and $3 billion of funding. Over the last decade, whole-exome sequencing (WES) established itself as a method that successfully balances cost and the output of useful data for diagnostic or research applications. Here, we look at how WES is used in both the laboratory and the clinic, and why it is a preferred method of choice in such areas.

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The Evolution of Proteomics – Professor Ruedi Aebersold
Article

Kicking off "The Evolution of Proteomics" series is a pioneer of proteomics, Professor Ruedi Aebersold. Aebersold's research in quantitative proteomics has helped shape our understanding of how proteins function, interact and are localized in both normal and diseased states.

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Antibodies in Research: The Good, the Bad, and the Validation Epidemic
Article

The specificity of antibody binding is incredibly important for many research disciplines, yet sourcing the best antibody for your research can be a challenge. This is partly because not all suppliers validate their antibodies sufficiently. How much of a problem is this?

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The Evolving Field of Cancer Biomarkers
Article

Given the complexity of cancer, it’s arguably unlikely that single molecules will work as clinically meaningful biomarkers for cancer. Today, biomarker discovery involves detecting patterns – characteristics or phenotypes that can be measured and monitored throughout a patient’s journey. Here, we look at two approaches being explored in this evolving field.

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