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Biosearch Technologies Awarded Phase II Army SBIR Grant


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Biosearch Technologies, Inc. (Biosearch) has announced that the company has been awarded a Phase II Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) grant from the Department of Defense (DoD). The purpose of the $800,000+ Phase II grant is to continue the design and development of rapid and highly accurate assays for pathogens of military importance.

The assays will be based on reverse transcriptase quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-qPCR) modified for field deployment in overseas military operations. The grant includes rapid assays for six arbovirus pathogens listed in the top 20 of the Global Risk-Severity Index (GRSI) compiled by the Armed Forces Medical Intelligence Center (AFMIC).

In addition, several of these agents are listed as Category A or B Priority Pathogens by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID). The grant also covers development of Analyte Specific Reagents (ASRs).

Jerry Ruth, PhD, Director of Research and Development at Biosearch Technologies, comments, “Field-deployable assays for the rapid and specific detection of highly infectious and often lethal diseases in the field of operations are of paramount importance to military personnel. Additionally, such assays may also be used for monitoring the environmental source of such pathogens.” Dr. Ruth is the Principal Investigator of the award.
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