Lissencephaly in a Dish

News   Sep 19, 2017 | Original Story from the Karolinska Institute

 
Lissencephaly Modeled in a Dish for the First Time

iPS-derived neural stem cells in green and neurons in red from a healthy individual (to the left) and a person with lissencephaly (to the right). The sample from the healthy person gives rise to fewer immature cells (neural stem cells). Credit: Karolinska Institute

 
 
 

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