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Electrochemical Sensor Development Kit Wins Dolomite and Lab on a Chip's Productizing Science® Competition 2015
Product News

Electrochemical Sensor Development Kit Wins Dolomite and Lab on a Chip's Productizing Science® Competition 2015

Electrochemical Sensor Development Kit Wins Dolomite and Lab on a Chip's Productizing Science® Competition 2015
Product News

Electrochemical Sensor Development Kit Wins Dolomite and Lab on a Chip's Productizing Science® Competition 2015


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Zimmertech fought off strong competition from numerous innovative entries to finish ahead of the field with its concept of an electrochemical sensor development kit to aid research into new electrochemical assays for the detection of diseases.

The Productizing Science Competition aims to bridge the gap between scientific innovation and commercial success – turning early stage technologies into market-leading products – and will enable Zimmertech to take advantage of Dolomite's outstanding R&D capabilities to further enhance its groundbreaking concept. 

The prize-winning electrochemical sensor development kit is designed to aid the development of portable hand-held diagnostics devices, allowing laboratory technology-based assays to be performed in the field. 

The sensors incorporate bio-functionalizable electrochemical substrates in a range of geometries, helping engineers to quickly establish an understanding of the interaction between assay protocols and hardware, as well as the effect of scaling the device size up or down, enabling rapid development of new electrochemical assays. This smart design can be extended to a variety of other detection methods, such as optical, SPR or acoustic detection, offering great potential for additional applications in the future.

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