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3D Biomatrix Announces Allowance of U.S. Patent
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3D Biomatrix Announces Allowance of U.S. Patent

3D Biomatrix Announces Allowance of U.S. Patent
News

3D Biomatrix Announces Allowance of U.S. Patent

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3D Biomatrix, Inc. announce the Notice of Allowance of its U.S. Patent for technology included in the Perfecta3D  Hanging Drop Plates, a novel platform that makes 3D spheroid and embryoid body growth, along with an array of co-cultures, simple and inexpensive to perform. The patent entitled “Hanging Drop Devices, Systems and/or Methods” covers several core technologies: 

• The development of a complete hanging drop system that allows the performance of cell analysis in individual hanging drops within a standard 96- or 384-well platform. 

• The specific design of the Perfecta3D Hanging Drop Plate, which allows the growth of one spheroid or embryoid body per well without adherence to a plastic surface or other substance. 

• The inclusion of a water or media reservoir that acts as a humidity source to alleviate the commonly-encountered hanging drop evaporation problem. 

Researchers have long tested drug compounds and other factors affecting cell growth on flat surfaces in two dimensions (2D), but 2D cell cultures do not accurately represent how cells behave in the three-dimensional body. 3D cell cultures grown in the Perfecta3D Hanging Drop Plates allow researchers to recapitulate these characteristics in vitro, providing a more physiologically-relevant model. 3D Biomatrix’s Hanging Drop Plates facilitate the consistent and controllable growth of small spherical cellular 3D clusters in a well-plate format, allowing researchers to test compounds and other factors in a 3D environment that reflects the human body. 

3D Biomatrix and the University of Michigan are listed as the assignees of the patent. 3D Biomatrix holds an exclusive license for worldwide rights to the intellectual property covered by this patent. The inventors of the Perfecta3D technology include Shuichi Takayama, a professor having a joint appointment in the Department of Biomedical Engineering and Macromolecular Science and Engineering at the University of Michigan, Yi-Chung Tung, Amy Yu-Ching Hsiao and Edward Jan. Dr. Takayama is a member of 3D Biomatrix’s Scientific Advisory Board. 

“The allowance of this patent is an important milestone, and we will continue to expand our IP portfolio. Life science and drug discovery researchers want more relevant tools in their toolbox. Although the hanging drop technology has been used for decades, the available techniques were difficult to use making it challenging to reproduce results consistently. The 96- and 384-well Perfecta3D Hanging Drop Plates make spheroid growth, long- and short-term cultures, and expansive co-culture models simple to perform and reproduce in 3D,” said 3D Biomatrix CEO Laura Schrader.

"Our worldwide customers include researchers in academia performing cell biology, cancer and stem cell research as well as leading pharmaceutical companies who want to reduce the drug attrition rate by getting more relevant answers earlier in their research process along with the ability to perform high-content analysis and high-throughput screening,” concluded Schrader.

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