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A Potential Drug Target for Diabetic Retinopathy

News   Sep 20, 2019 | Original story from Elsevier

 
A Potential Drug Target for Diabetic Retinopathy

ffect of recombinant lysyl oxidase propeptide (rLOX-PP) on the development of acellular capillaries (ACs) and pericyte loss (PL) in rat retinas. A-D: Representative retinal trypsin digest images showing retinal vascular networks of a control rat (A), diabetic (DM) rat (B), rat intravitreally injected with rLOX-PP (C), and rat intravitreally injected with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) (D). LOX-PP administration promoted the development of ACs (arrows) and PL (arrowheads) associated with diabetic retinopathy. Enlarged images correspond to boxed areas (Right panels of A, B, C, D). Scale bar = 100 μm. Credit: The American Journal of Pathology

 
 
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