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Aviva Collaborates with the Institute for Systems Biology to Develop Antibodies
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Aviva Collaborates with the Institute for Systems Biology to Develop Antibodies

Aviva Collaborates with the Institute for Systems Biology to Develop Antibodies
News

Aviva Collaborates with the Institute for Systems Biology to Develop Antibodies

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Aviva Systems Biology entered into a collaborative agreement with the Institute for Systems Biology (ISB) to develop new antibodies for liver toxicity biomarker discovery.

ISB is providing Aviva Systems Biology with a list of proteins for which Aviva will produce antibodies. ISB will then assess the antibodies for efficacy and if appropriate, use them to identify possible biomarker proteins that indicate early liver toxicity.

The antibodies are used in surface plasma resonance imaging, which detects proteins at lower levels of density than is possible with other technologies such as mass spectrometry, according to Aviva.

"In order to make progress in our research we needed to expand beyond those antibodies already available in the market, because proteins with these specificities have been extensively studied," says Leroy Hood, M.D., president and one of the founders of ISB.

"We look forward to using the new automation technology of this collaboration to identify many new antibodies for proteins that serve as indicators of liver toxicity."

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