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Axxam and PerkinElmer Sign Exclusive Licensing Agreement for Photina® Technology
News

Axxam and PerkinElmer Sign Exclusive Licensing Agreement for Photina® Technology

Axxam and PerkinElmer Sign Exclusive Licensing Agreement for Photina® Technology
News

Axxam and PerkinElmer Sign Exclusive Licensing Agreement for Photina® Technology

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Axxam and PerkinElmer have signed a global licensing agreement whereby PerkinElmer will become the exclusive provider of the Axxam Photina® photoprotein technology to the drug discovery market.

Axxam retains the rights to use the technology for its discovery services to third parties, as assay development, high-throughput screening (HTS) and compound profiling, as well as for any further application of development of this technology. This agreement does not affect current discovery service contracts.

The terms of the agreement also provide for a formal research and development program between Axxam and PerkinElmer to develop additional Photina® GPCR and ion channel cell lines for use in high throughput screening and compound profiling

The Photina® technology is a luminescent cell-based assay platform optimized for screening important drug discovery targets, including G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) and ion channels.

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