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CEM Wins 10th R&D 100 Award
News

CEM Wins 10th R&D 100 Award

CEM Wins 10th R&D 100 Award
News

CEM Wins 10th R&D 100 Award

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CEM Corporation has announced that the Investigator™ System, an integrated microwave synthesis system and Raman spectrometer, has won the 2005 R&D 100 Award, becoming the tenth CEM instrument to do so. The award is presented on a yearly basis by the editors of R&D Magazine in recognition of the most "technologically significant new products and processes of the year." CEM has won the award 7 out of the last 10 years. "We are honored that R&D Magazine has chosen to recognize our latest microwave laboratory instrument with this prestigious award," said Michael J. Collins, President and CEO of CEM Corporation. "It is a singular distinction to be chosen again and we would like to thank the judges and the editors of R&D Magazine for their consideration." The Investigator System is also the third consecutive system from CEM's Life Science Division to win the award. Last year, CEM's Odyssey™ Microwave Peptide Synthesizer was recognized and the company's Voyager™ System for scale up of microwave synthesis reactions won 2003. "This award is a testament to the strong pipeline of products coming out of CEM's R&D program," continued Collins. "The new systems continue to expand the previous boundaries of microwave technology with novel applications being explored in different areas of life science, helping to further the potential of microwave-enhanced chemistry."
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