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Drug “Hunter” Honoured
News

Drug “Hunter” Honoured

Drug “Hunter” Honoured
News

Drug “Hunter” Honoured

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One of the world’s most renowned “drug hunters” has been awarded an honorary Doctor of Science from the University of Brighton in recognition of his “significant achievements in the pharmaceutical industry over the past 30 years”.

Dr Martin Mackay, president of Research and Development with global research-based biopharmaceutical company AstraZeneca, currently is leading development of the next generation of drugs to combat diseases associated with ageing, and a new drug to prevent blood clotting.

Professor Andrew Lloyd, dean of the University of Brighton’ s Faculty of Science and Engineering, said Dr Mackay was a “drug hunter” with a “remarkable ability” to recognize new drug opportunities. He said few individuals had contributed as much to the success of the global pharmaceutical industry as he had.

Dr Mackay, who carried out research at the University of Brighton for seven years, joined the world’s largest pharmaceutical company Pfizer, and oversaw the development of a plethora of drugs including Vfend, the anti-fungal treatment, and Marabiroc, an effective treatment for HIV and which prevents the virus entering the patient’s immune system.

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