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Einstein Researchers Uses Dyversity Image Analysis System for Proteins Detection
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Einstein Researchers Uses Dyversity Image Analysis System for Proteins Detection

Einstein Researchers Uses Dyversity Image Analysis System for Proteins Detection
News

Einstein Researchers Uses Dyversity Image Analysis System for Proteins Detection

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Syngene has announced that one of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York is using Dyversity, Syngene’s 2D gel imaging system, to assist in understanding the proteomic basis of human aging.

Scientists in the Departments of Medicine and Molecular Genetics at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine are isolating proteins from the serum of Ashkenazi Jewish centenarians, their offspring and age-matched offspring controls.

The proteins are extracted and then run on 1D gels stained with Coomassie blue and are also transferred onto Western blots, probed with different antibodies and then stained with Horse Radish Peroxidase.

The 1D protein gels and Western blots produced are imaged and analyzed using a Dyversity system, enabling researchers to detect specific proteins and establish if these are connected with a longer life.

Dr Cagdas Tazearslan, Research Associate at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, commented: “We have been using the Dyversity since 2008 and we installed this system because we needed to accurately detect small amounts of proteins and also assess phosphorylation levels of different signal transduction molecules which may have an impact on the human aging process.”

Dr Tazearslan continued: “By using the Dyversity we have been able to rapidly generate reproducible image data to measure how different IGF1R gene variants found in centenarians differentially modulate phosphorylation levels of downstream kinases and transcription factors. By using Dyversity, we are able to avoid saturation problems experienced when using X-ray films, therefore we have more confidence in the band quantification. Because of this, not only our group, but also different labs within the college prefer to use the Dyversity system to produce images and quantify their bands.”
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