Graphene on Toast, Anyone?

News   Feb 20, 2018 | Original Story by Mike Williams for Rice University.

 
Graphene on Toast, Anyone?

Rice University scientists experimented with various materials to create highly conductive laser-induced graphene, a foamy variant of the one-atom-thick form of carbon. Graphene burned into food could be used as radio-frequency tags for tracking or sensors to warn if the food is contaminated, according to Rice chemist James Tour. Credit: Jeff Fitlow/Rice University.

 
 
 

RELATED ARTICLES

Watching Stem Cells Repair Spinal Cord in Real Time

News

Clues to the reversal of brain and spine injury.

READ MORE

Synthetic DNA Shuffling Enzyme Outpaces Natural Counterpart

News

A new synthetic enzyme, crafted from DNA rather than protein, flips lipid molecules within the cell membrane, triggering a signal pathway that could be harnessed to induce cell death in cancer cells. Researchers say their lipid-scrambling DNA enzyme is the first in its class to outperform naturally occurring enzymes – and does so by three orders of magnitude

READ MORE

Bloodstains at Crime Scenes Can Now be Used to Determine Age of Suspect

News

A new blood test, which could be performed at a crime scene, could help determine the age of a suspect or victim within just an hour.

READ MORE

 

Comments | 0 ADD COMMENT

Like what you just read? You can find similar content on the communities below.

Analysis & Separations Applied Sciences Cell Science Proteomics & Metabolomics

To personalize the content you see on Technology Networks homepage, Log In or Subscribe for Free

LOGIN SUBSCRIBE FOR FREE
 

We've updated our Privacy Policy to make it clearer how we use your personal data.

We use cookies to provide you with a better experience, read our Cookie Policy