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Identifying Unknown Modulators of Pain with New Phenotypic Assays
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Identifying Unknown Modulators of Pain with New Phenotypic Assays

Identifying Unknown Modulators of Pain with New Phenotypic Assays
News

Identifying Unknown Modulators of Pain with New Phenotypic Assays

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Cellectricon has announced that Dr Paul Karila, Head of Discovery Services, will be speaking at the SMi Pain Therapeutics conference (London, 20 May at 11 am).

The presentation will reveal the latest wave of electric field assisted cell manipulation technologies for advancing research in neurobiology.

Using an exemplary case study, attendees will gain a valuable and practical understanding of new phenotypic-based approaches, as Dr Karila highlights the methodologies, progress to date and the challenges still to overcome in pain research.

Paving the way for novel research methods into cytoskeletal disturbances, Cellectricon’s advanced Cellaxess® systems, provides scientists with an assay-based platform that can identify previously unknown targets.

During his talk, Dr Karila will explain how these phenotypic assays enable the detection of compounds acting along the peripheral sensitization pathway, and via data validation, will demonstrate how such techniques can progress research into the modulators of pain and accelerate the drug discovery process.

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