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Influence of Particle Design on Oral Absorption of Poorly Water-Soluble Drug in a Silica Particle-Supercritical Fluid System
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Influence of Particle Design on Oral Absorption of Poorly Water-Soluble Drug in a Silica Particle-Supercritical Fluid System

Influence of Particle Design on Oral Absorption of Poorly Water-Soluble Drug in a Silica Particle-Supercritical Fluid System
News

Influence of Particle Design on Oral Absorption of Poorly Water-Soluble Drug in a Silica Particle-Supercritical Fluid System

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Abstract

The physicochemical characteristics and oral absorption of a poorly water-soluble drug, K-832, adsorbed onto porous silica (Sylysia 350), were compared with those of K-832 adsorbed onto non-porous silica (Aerosil 200). K-832 and silica were treated with supercritical CO2 (scCO2) to produce K-832-Sylysia 350 and K-832-Aerosil 200 formulations. Scanning electron microscopy, polarizing microscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, and differential scanning calorimetry results suggested that K-832 mainly existed in an amorphous state in both formulations. The specific surface area of both formulations was much larger than that of pure K-832 crystals. The dissolution rate of K-832 from both formulations was considerably greater than that from corresponding physical mixtures due to rapid wetting of the hydrophilic carrier surfaces and amorphous state, the dissolution from the K-832-Sylysia 350 formulation being the fastest. In vivo absorption tests on the two formulations indicated no significant differences in their peak concentration (C(max)) and the area under their plasma concentration-time curve (AUC), while the concentrations of K-832 in the K-832-Sylysia 350 formulation were significantly higher than those in the K-832-Aerosil 200 formulation 1 h and 1.5 h after administration of these formulations (p<0.05). This could be attributed to the different dispersion states of K-832 in the formulations due to their different three-dimensional structures (porous and non-porous). In physical stability tests, the amorphous drugs in both formulations were stable at room temperature for at least 14 months. Thus, the absorption of poorly water-soluble drugs could be greatly improved by adsorption onto porous silica using scCO2.

The article is published online Chemical & Pharmaceutical Bulletin and is free to access.

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