“Molecular Pencil Sharpener” Discovery Opens the Door to Finding New Drugs

News   Oct 24, 2017 | Original story from Rutgers University

 
 “Molecular Pencil Sharpener” Discovery Opens the Door to Finding New Drugs

In this depiction of a "molecular pencil sharpener," the pentagons are chemicals that make a "warhead" toxic once it is "sharpened" by Tld - bacterial proteins. The proteins are inactive until a "leader" -- the pencil wood surrounding the graphite in this portrayal -- is removed. The wood shavings inside the sharpener are the remains of the leader being chopped up by the proteins, releasing a powerful antibiotic that kills E. coli bacteria. Credit: Dmitry Ghilarov/Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology and David Lawson/John Innes Centre

 
 
 

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