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NIH Issues $2.87 Million Drug Development Grant to Cerageneix
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NIH Issues $2.87 Million Drug Development Grant to Cerageneix

NIH Issues $2.87 Million Drug Development Grant to Cerageneix
News

NIH Issues $2.87 Million Drug Development Grant to Cerageneix

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Ceragenix Pharmaceuticals, Inc. has announced that the National Institutes of Health (NIH) has awarded a $2.87 million grant to fund the pre clinical development of a Ceragenin™ based oral drug to treat two common and potentially deadly gastrointestinal infections: Clostrdium difficile and Shigella. The grant will fund the preclinical development, formulation, toxicology and cGMP scale up to 1 kilogram of CSA-13.

The research grant has been awarded to a consortium of research institutions led by Brigham Young University (BYU) and including SRI International (Menlo Park, CA), Southwest Research Institute (SwRI, San Antonio, TX) and McMaster University (Hamilton, Ontario, Canada). Ceragenins™ are a class of novel antimicrobial compounds that mimic functions of the body’s own innate immune system.

The Ceragenin™ technology was invented by Dr. Paul B. Savage (Reed Izatt Professor at BYU) and has been exclusively licensed by BYU to Ceragenix. There have been over 30 peer reviewed scientific publications on this novel class of compounds.
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