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Panel Urges Further Research to Determine Which DCIS Patients may be Candidates for Less-Invasive Therapy
News

Panel Urges Further Research to Determine Which DCIS Patients may be Candidates for Less-Invasive Therapy

Panel Urges Further Research to Determine Which DCIS Patients may be Candidates for Less-Invasive Therapy
News

Panel Urges Further Research to Determine Which DCIS Patients may be Candidates for Less-Invasive Therapy

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Because most women diagnosed with DCIS are treated, it is difficult to determine the comparative benefits of different treatment strategies versus active surveillance, meaning systematic follow-up. An independent panel convened by the NIH urged the scientific community to identify appropriate biomarkers and other prognostic factors to better predict the risk of developing breast cancer.

"Instead of treating all women diagnosed with DCIS, we need to determine which individuals are likely to develop invasive breast cancer and which will not," said Dr. Carmen Allegra, panel chair and Chief of Hematology and Oncology at the University of Florida. "If we could accurately predict this, we might save some women from undergoing unnecessary invasive treatments while achieving the same positive outcomes."

DCIS is a condition in which a spectrum of abnormal cells are found in the breast duct and have not spread outside the duct to other tissues in the breast. Since the advent of widespread screening mammography in the early to mid 1980's, rates of DCIS have increased sharply. It is estimated that more than one million U.S. women will be living with a prior diagnosis of DCIS by 2020.

To improve our understanding of this complex disease, the panel recommended efforts to ensure detailed collection of clinical, pathological, imaging, and molecular data about DCIS using standardized reporting measures, annotated specimen repositories, and multicenter databases.

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