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Prosonix Confirms the Potential of its Multi-component Particle™ Technology
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Prosonix Confirms the Potential of its Multi-component Particle™ Technology

Prosonix Confirms the Potential of its Multi-component Particle™ Technology
News

Prosonix Confirms the Potential of its Multi-component Particle™ Technology

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Prosonix has announced that it has confirmed the potential of its Multi-component Particle™ (MCP™) Technology for creating novel inhaled, dual and triple fixed dose combination (FDC) therapies for respiratory diseases. The Company will use the information generated to advance one or more candidates into formal development studies in the coming months.

Prosonix’ MCP™ Technology allows the combination of two or more active drug molecules in a pre-determined and constant ratio into a single drug-only particle, without the need for additional excipients.

The resultant formulations thereof could facilitate for the first time the therapeutic labelled dose to be delivered precisely to the site of action in the lung in a targeted fashion from a single pressurized metered dose inhaler (pMDI) or dry powder inhaler (DPI) device.

MCP™ based formulations created by Prosonix include optimally engineered dual and triple combinations of known drug products, including inhaled corticosteroids (ICS), long-acting beta-agonists (LABAs) and long-acting muscarinic antagonists (LAMAs).

In addition, these uniquely engineered FDCs offer the potential for enhanced localized synergistic pharmacological effect, dose sparing and compliance, as well as administration via simple, cost-effective inhaler devices.

The announcement marks the successful conclusion of a comprehensive research programme led by Prosonix as part of a consortium including internationally recognized respiratory disease and drug inhalation experts: Professor Peter Barnes and Dr Omar Usmani at Imperial College London, Dr Ben Forbes at King’s College London and Professor Rob Price at the University of Bath.

The consortium was supported by a funding award from the Biomedical Catalyst, an integrated translational funding programme jointly operated by the UK Medical Research Council and the UK’s innovation agency, the Technology Strategy Board. The programme involved multiple aspects of manufacturability, in vitro and ex vivo testing, and the development of new biologically relevant models.

David Hipkiss, Prosonix’ CEO, said: “We are delighted that the outcome of the Biomedical Catalyst programme has confirmed the potential of our MCP™ Technology as a basis for the development of cost-effective fixed dose combination therapies for respiratory diseases. Such combinations, in particular triple FDCs, are expected to become the mainstay of therapy in a large proportion of COPD patients over the coming years as they are anticipated to have important clinical, patient and payer benefits, being more convenient and more cost-effective than the current standard of care, which involves taking multiple medications from separate, often diverse, devices. We thank our collaborators for their valuable contributions to this project and we look forward to selecting candidates for formal development studies over the coming months.”

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