We've updated our Privacy Policy to make it clearer how we use your personal data.

We use cookies to provide you with a better experience. You can read our Cookie Policy here.

Advertisement
Real-Time Visualization and Quantitation of Vascular Permeability In Vivo: Implications for Drug Delivery
News

Real-Time Visualization and Quantitation of Vascular Permeability In Vivo: Implications for Drug Delivery

Real-Time Visualization and Quantitation of Vascular Permeability In Vivo: Implications for Drug Delivery
News

Real-Time Visualization and Quantitation of Vascular Permeability In Vivo: Implications for Drug Delivery

Read time:
 

Want a FREE PDF version of This News Story?

Complete the form below and we will email you a PDF version of "Real-Time Visualization and Quantitation of Vascular Permeability In Vivo: Implications for Drug Delivery"

First Name*
Last Name*
Email Address*
Country*
Company Type*
Job Function*
Would you like to receive further email communication from Technology Networks?

Technology Networks Ltd. needs the contact information you provide to us to contact you about our products and services. You may unsubscribe from these communications at any time. For information on how to unsubscribe, as well as our privacy practices and commitment to protecting your privacy, check out our Privacy Policy

Abstract
The leaky, heterogeneous vasculature of human tumors prevents the even distribution of systemic drugs within cancer tissues. However, techniques for studying vascular delivery systems in vivo often require complex mammalian models and time-consuming, surgical protocols. The developing chicken embryo is a well-established model for human cancer that is easily accessible for tumor imaging. To assess this model for the in vivo analysis of tumor permeability, human tumors were grown on the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM), a thin vascular membrane which overlays the growing chick embryo. The real-time movement of small fluorescent dextrans through the tumor vasculature and surrounding tissues were used to measure vascular leak within tumor xenografts. Dextran extravasation within tumor sites was selectively enhanced an interleukin-2 (IL-2) peptide fragment or vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). VEGF treatment increased vascular leak in the tumor core relative to surrounding normal tissue and increased doxorubicin uptake in human tumor xenografts. This new system easily visualizes vascular permeability changes in vivo and suggests that vascular permeability may be manipulated to improve chemotherapeutic targeting to tumors.

This article was published online in PLoS ONE and is free to access.

Advertisement