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Synthesis of Potent Antibiotic Involves Unusual First Steps

News   Jan 19, 2021 | Original story from Penn State

 
Synthesis of Potent Antibiotic Involves Unusual First Steps

The synthesis of the potent antibiotic thiostrepton uses a radical SAM protein TsrM, whose crystal structure is shown at left while bound to an iron-sulfur cluster and cobalamin. New images of this crystal structure allowed researchers from Penn State to infer the chemical steps during the antibiotic's synthesis (right), as a methyl group moves from a molecule called S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) to the cobalamin in TsrM to the substrate tryptophan. Credit: Booker Lab, Penn State

 
 
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