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The future looks green (and small) at the BA Festival of Science
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The future looks green (and small) at the BA Festival of Science

The future looks green (and small) at the BA Festival of Science
News

The future looks green (and small) at the BA Festival of Science

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Green chemistry is about developing new products and processes which eliminate the need to use hazardous substances. But how effective is green chemistry and can we envisage a future free of hazardous substances and by-products? ‘Green chemistry - towards a more sustainable future?’ looks at these issues, as well as the problems that still need to be addressed. 


 


It is estimated that over 90% of production materials do not end up in saleable products and 80% of products are discarded after a single use. Dr Mike Pitts will speak about the importance of reducing the impact of products we by. He believes that, while sustainable chemistry technologies are being used to help reduce the impact of our lifestyles on our planet’s resources, a greater understanding of produce lifestyles will lead to even more ingenious solutions.


 


We take new technology for granted - smaller and lighter mobiles and laptops and longer lasting batteries. But for this to happen, chemists must continually search for new materials for these applications, or optimise existing ones. ‘New materials for the 21st century’ brings together a wealth of speakers to discuss the latest research.  Highlights include Professor Paul Chalker describing how new processes are enabling computers to get smaller and faster, Professor Steve Rannard explaining why small materials such as organic nanoparticles are having such a large impact, and Professor Andy Cooper showing how ice can burn!


 


Meet Kavli Prize winner Professor Sten Grillner from the Karolinska Institute's Nobel Institute for Neurophysiology in Stockholm. Examine the cutting edge science of how the brain makes us move and in particular the cellular and molecular design of the neural networks that control movement. Professor Grillner was a co-recipient, with Thomas Jessell and Pasko Rakic, of the inaugural Kavli Prize for Neuroscience earlier this year.


 


This year’s BA Festival of Science is organised by the BA (British Association for the Advancement of Science) in partnership with the University of Liverpool. It is supported by the Department for Innovation, Universities & Skills, the Liverpool Culture Company and the Northwest Regional Development Agency. The Press Centre is sponsored by AstraZeneca.


 


 

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