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Thermo Fisher Scientific Names Recipients of In Vitro Protein Expression Grants


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Thermo Fisher Scientific announced the recipients of $25,000 worth of in vitro protein expression kits to advance biomedical research and drug discovery.

Two $12,500 product awards were made through the Thermo Scientific Pierce In Vitro Grant Program. Two projects were chosen by a scientific panel based on the potential of the research to advance science and medicine as supported by scientific merit, significance, approach and data.

Matthew A. Coleman, associate adjunct professor in the Department of Radiation Oncology within the National Institutes of Health-funded Cancer Center at the University of California at Davis and a senior scientist at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, will receive $12,500 in Pierce Human In Vitro Translation Products to produce full-length, stable G-Protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) to test the effects of glycosylation on function.

Professor Coleman’s lab focuses on studying genome stability and the use of nanotechnology to analyze cell signaling Michael MacCoss, associate professor in the Department of Genome Sciences at the University of Washington in Seattle, will receive $12,500 in Pierce Human In Vitro Translation Products to help his laboratory create a proteome-wide mass spectrometry database to facilitate selective protein quantitation from complex biological samples. Professor MacCoss’ lab is developing stable isotopic- and mass spectrometry-based approaches to analyzing the proteome.

Pierce Human In Vitro Translation Products for protein or glycoprotein synthesis impart superior functionality compared to alternative systems such as rabbit, E. coli or wheat germ systems. In vitro translated protein can be used for many different applications, including protein interaction studies, mutational analysis and enzymatic activity assays.
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