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Why Once-promising Cancer Drugs Failed

News   Jan 25, 2019 | Original story from Duke University

 
Why Once-promising Cancer Drugs Failed

Invading cells (green) in the lab worm C. elegans (purple) can change their tactics to get around cancer drugs called MMP inhibitors and trespass into other tissues. The findings may point to better ways to block cancer's spread. Credit: Laura Kelley, Duke University

 
 
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