We've updated our Privacy Policy to make it clearer how we use your personal data.

We use cookies to provide you with a better experience. You can read our Cookie Policy here.

Advertisement
Bruker Introduces High-Performance Opterra™ Multipoint Scanning Confocal Microscope
Product News

Bruker Introduces High-Performance Opterra™ Multipoint Scanning Confocal Microscope

Bruker Introduces High-Performance Opterra™ Multipoint Scanning Confocal Microscope
Product News

Bruker Introduces High-Performance Opterra™ Multipoint Scanning Confocal Microscope


Want a FREE PDF version of This Product News?

Complete the form below and we will email you a PDF version of "Bruker Introduces High-Performance Opterra™ Multipoint Scanning Confocal Microscope"

First Name*
Last Name*
Email Address*
Country*
Company Type*
Job Function*
Would you like to receive further email communication from Technology Networks?

Technology Networks Ltd. needs the contact information you provide to us to contact you about our products and services. You may unsubscribe from these communications at any time. For information on how to unsubscribe, as well as our privacy practices and commitment to protecting your privacy, check out our Privacy Policy

At the 2013 American Society for Cell Biology Annual Meeting, Bruker has introduced the Opterra Multipoint Scanning Confocal Microscope, which sets a new standard for integration of confocal imaging with photoactivation.

The new Opterra microscope utilizes a number of innovative features to obtain the speed of wide-field imaging and the resolution of traditional confocal systems while minimizing phototoxicity, making it an ideal solution for gentle and fast confocal imaging of live cell preparations.

A seven-position pinhole/slit aperture allows the Opterra to be optimized for varying objective lens magnifications that results in the ability to image deeper into tissue versus conventional disk scanning confocal microscopes.

“The Opterra has proven to be a major advance in terms of rapid, time-based volumetric imaging,” said Dr. Mario De Bono, Medical Research Council Group Leader at the Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Cambridge University, UK. “The speed of the system, coupled with its sensitivity and resolution has significantly enhanced our ability to visualize neural activity in 3D in C. elegans at speeds that were previously not possible. The ability to change pinhole size is great, as it allows us to match the imaging setup with the specimen.”

“Our new Opterra provides a flexible optical workstation for cell biologists to perform confocal imaging of live cells and small organisms with simultaneous point and area scanning for photoactivation and photoablation,” explained Mike Szulczewski, Vice President and General Manager of Bruker's Fluorescence Microscopy business.

Szulczewski continued, “The tight integration of optical imaging with optical stimulation techniques enables investigators to take full advantage of today’s imaging and photochemical probe technologies.”

Advertisement