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QMF Launches World's First Clinical Trial of Drug-Free Infrared Light Therapy to Treat Dementia
Product News

QMF Launches World's First Clinical Trial of Drug-Free Infrared Light Therapy to Treat Dementia

QMF Launches World's First Clinical Trial of Drug-Free Infrared Light Therapy to Treat Dementia
Product News

QMF Launches World's First Clinical Trial of Drug-Free Infrared Light Therapy to Treat Dementia


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Quietmind Foundation (QMF), a not-for-profit clinical research, consultation, and training organization at the forefront of noninvasive, drug-free treatments for dementia and other neurocognitive impairments, is launching the first-ever clinical trial of its type to assess a new approach to improve mental functioning for sufferers of early-stage dementia.

The study measures whether problems with executive functioning (including attention, working memory, strategies of learning and remembering, planning, organizing, self-monitoring, inhibition, and flexible thinking) can be positively influenced by repeated brief exposures to 1072nm infrared light stimulation to increase cerebral blood flow (CBF) and oxygenation. Early results from testing the technology in the United Kingdom have been encouraging.

"We have seen strong early evidence that infrared light stimulation can help dementia patients regain lost ground," notes Marvin H. Berman,Ph.D. who heads Quietmind Foundation. "This approach also represents a new direction for those seeking nonpharmacological treatment for themselves or their loved ones."

This randomized, controlled, double-blind study requires that applicants be between the ages of 50 and 85 and previously diagnosed with early-stage dementia. Participants go through several initial steps, including an evaluation of cognitive functioning, a specialized electroencephalographic (EEG) recording of brain activity, and pen and paper cognitive testing.

In addition, the study requires a 28-day commitment. Those selected are randomly assigned to receive either an active treatment or a placebo treatment daily for 28 consecutive days.

Study participants will be compensated $250 for their time after their full participation in the clinical trial. The initial trial will be conducted at QMF's offices in Plymouth Meeting, Pa., or select area locations. Other locations will be considered based on expressed interest.

"Infrared light energy is already being used today in wide-ranging, proven applications - from the treatment of common cold sores and chronic pain to life-saving, battlefield wound healing," notes Jack Lebeau, M.D., FACC, QMF's Medical Director and the study's Principal Investigator. "We at QMF are hopeful that infrared's apparent cell protection and regeneration properties will be equally successful against the mechanism of dementia."

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