SPR Imaging-based Microarray for Enhanced Multianalyte Detection in Blood Plasma

Video   Jul 07, 2015


About the SpeakerResearch Assistant, Institute of Photonics and Electronics ASCR, v.v.i., Prague, Czech Republic2010 - present: Doctoral Study: Charles University, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Department of Biophysics Thesis: Multifunctional biomolecular systems for parallelized analysis of biomolecular interaction2007 - 2009: Master Study: Charles University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry Thesis: Study of biomolecular interactions by the method of surface plasmon resonance2004 - 2007: Bachelor study: Charles University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry Thesis: Optical biosensors and study of biomolecular interactions.
AbstractThis work reports on a novel biosensor allowing for ultra-sensitive multianalyte detection in blood plasma. The biosensor combines a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) imaging-based microarray assay with biofunctionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) for the sensitive and label-free detection of cancer biomarkers. Passive mixing structures are employed to further improve the sensing performance of this SPR imaging biosensor. Preliminary results have shown that the AuNPs increase the contrast between the specific and non-specific binding, which presents major issue in SPR biosensor-based analysis of complex samples (e.g. blood plasma), and thus allow increasing sensitivity and specificity of the biosensor. The passive mixing structures provide significant rates of fluid mixing within the flow channel, enhancing analyte binding rates and improving homogeneity of sensor response along the multi-spot array. The results of this work can be used to significantly enhance the detection capabilities of SPR imaging-based microarrays, regardless of the analyte and sample matrix in question.


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