The Gene Factory: Can Enzymes Revolutionize Man-Made DNA Synthesis?

Article

Building artificial DNA sounds like a technology out of science fiction, but has been conducted in labs for nearly 40 years. To make the potential of synthetic DNA a reality, new methods are being developed that aim to make creating DNA as fast as sequencing it.

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New Software Finds Disease Genes Faster

News

A new study, affiliated with UNIST has recently presented a novel statistical algorithm, capable of identifying potential disease genes in a more accurate and cost-effective way. This algorithm has also been considered as a new promising approach for the identification of candidate disease genes, as it works effectively with less genomic data and takes only a minute or two to get results.

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One Year on, Scientists Defend Canada’s Anti-Genetic Discrimination Law

Article

The Canadian Genetic Non-Discrimination Act (GNA), introduced last May, made it illegal to require individuals to disclose genetic test results or to compel individuals to undergo genetic tests for any agreement or service. However, a subsequent legal challenge has prompted a robust defense of the act from scientists in the May issue of the Canadian Medical Association Journal (CMAJ).

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This Seed Could Bring Clean Water to Millions

This Seed Could Bring Clean Water to Millions

News

Biomedical Engineering and Chemical Engineering Professors Bob Tilton and Todd Przybycien recently co-authored a paper with Ph.D. students Brittany Nordmark and Toni Bechtel, and alumnus John Riley, further refining a process that could soon help provide clean water to many in water-scarce regions. The process, created by Tilton’s former student and co-author Stephanie Velegol, uses sand and plant materials readily available in many developing nations to create a cheap and effective water filtration medium, termed “f-sand.”

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Herpesvirus and Alzheimer's Link: High abundance of Herpes genes in postmortem Alzheimer's brain tissue
News

Data from three different brain banks to suggest that human herpesviruses are more abundant in the brains of Alzheimer's patients and may play a role in regulatory genetic networks that are believed to lead to the disease.

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Gene-edited Pigs are Resistant to Billion-dollar Virus
News

Scientists have produced pigs that can resist one of the world’s most costly animal diseases, by changing their genetic code. Tests with the virus – called Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome, or PRRS – found the pigs do not become infected at all. The animals show no signs that the change in their DNA has had any other impact on their health or wellbeing.

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Penn Medicine Biochemist Receives Major Award for Research on Epigenetic Protein Modifications via Mass Spec
News

Benjamin A.Garcia, PhD, an expert in quantitative proteomics and Presidential Professor of Biochemistry and Biophysics in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, has been awarded the Biemann Medal by the American Society for Mass Spectrometry (ASMS). The early-career award recognizes significant achievement in basic or applied mass spectrometry.

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We're Not Prepared for the Genetic Revolution That's Coming
We're Not Prepared for the Genetic Revolution That's Coming
Article

New technologies are making genetic information (and the power to manipulate it) more widely available that ever before. What the public do with that information, and the effects of those actions, could be a defining theme of the 21st century.

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Metagenomics: Exploring Microbiomes at Nature’s New Frontiers
Metagenomics: Exploring Microbiomes at Nature’s New Frontiers
Article

Advances in sequencing technologies are providing scientists with a powerful way to view microbial communities in unprecedented detail. Metagenomics is a rapidly evolving field that is uncovering a wealth of hidden biodiversity, revolutionizing our understanding of uncharted corners in the living world.

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Tracking the Heritability of Cell Stress
Tracking the Heritability of Cell Stress
Article

As part of work recently published in Science Advances, a team of researchers from the Institute of Systems Biology at Yale University has built a microfluidic device to demonstrate that single cells preserve a memory of their mother's dynamic response to glucose limitation stress for multiple generations.

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The 3D Structure of Telomerase: Uncovering Its Role in Human Disease
The 3D Structure of Telomerase: Uncovering Its Role in Human Disease
Article

Researchers have published the first detailed picture and description of the 3-dimensional molecular structure of telomerase – a discovery that could enable better targeted drug screening and could result in more successful telomerase-related clinical therapeutics.

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Phenotypic versus Target-based Screening for Drug Discovery
Phenotypic versus Target-based Screening for Drug Discovery
Article

Target-based screening has been the method of choice in drug discovery for the past two decades, but phenotypic screening is having something of a renaissance. We look at the advantages and applications of both.

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Study Shows Night Owls Have a 10% Higher Risk of Early Death
Study Shows Night Owls Have a 10% Higher Risk of Early Death
Article

Scientists study link between chronotype and death, and find night owls are at greater risk of health complications and earlier death.

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