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Songbird Forebrain Circuits Mirror Those Seen in Mammals
News

Neuroscientists have examined neurons in a songbird's forebrain and have discovered a landscape of physiology, auditory coding and network roles that mirrored those in the brains of mammals.

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Researchers Discover How Lizards Breathe Underwater
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A team of evolutionary biologists from the University of Toronto has shown that Anolis lizards, or anoles, are able to breathe underwater with the aid of a bubble clinging to their snouts.

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Proteins That Enable Sense of Touch in Humans Are at Work in Plants Too
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A family of proteins that sense mechanical force—enabling our sense of touch and many other important bodily functions—also are essential for proper root growth in some plants, according to a study led by scientists at Scripps Research and Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI).

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The Genetic Architecture of How Parkinson's Disease Progresses Is Revealed
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A new study by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital published in Nature Genetics uncovers the genetic architecture of progression and prognosis of Parkinson's disease, identifying five genetic locations (loci) associated with progression.

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Twin Study Suggests Genetics Controls Abnormal Development
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Yale researchers have shown that developmental abnormalities, including those that lead to pregnancy loss and autism, are controlled by the genetics of the fetus and placenta — and not the mother’s intrauterine environment.

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Did Ancient People Have More Diverse Gut Microorganisms?
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Researchers have used human "paleofeces" to discover that ancient people had far different microorganisms living in their guts than we do in modern times.

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Teach Me in 10 Hub Page
Article

At Technology Networks we understand the importance of time. That's why we've launched Teach Me in 10 a video series that challenges scientists to present and summarize their research area, a scientific concept, or technology in ten minutes or less.

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Exploring Mental Health in Academia
Article

In this article, we explore why academia and research can be hard on an individual's mental health, speaking directly with the individuals and organizations that are championing mental health discussions in this space, and highlight areas where we're perhaps falling short and could improve.

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What the COVID-19 Pandemic Taught Us About Flexibility in Vaccine Manufacturing
Article

In this article, we will explore the manufacturing strategies and tools that the biopharmaceutical industry adopted to make such efficient COVID-19 vaccine production possible.

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The Ras Pathway and Cancer: Regulation, Challenges and Therapeutic Progress
Article

In normal health, Ras signaling is central to the regulation of intracellular signaling networks involved in cell proliferation, growth and survival. Like many cellular signaling pathways, however, the Ras-related cascade has a dark side. Mutations in the RAS gene itself, or in upstream or downstream regulators, can push the pathway into a constitutively active, cancer-inducing state.

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DNA Repair Hotspots and “Super-Agers”: An Interview With Fred “Rusty” Gage
Article

Fred “Rusty” Gage is president of the Salk Institute for Biological Studies. After his recent plenary at the British Neuroscience Association’s Festival of Neuroscience, we spoke with Gage about his research into how our DNA repairs itself and how Alzheimer's disease causes neurons to undergo and identity crisis.

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The Coronavirus Pandemic
Article

On December 31, 2019, the first cases of a novel coronavirus were identified in Wuhan City, Hubei Province, China. Here, we curate a collection of news and content related to what has become the COVID-19 pandemic.

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