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Applied Biosystems Awards Genomic Research Grant to St. Jude Children's Research Hospital
News

Applied Biosystems Awards Genomic Research Grant to St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Applied Biosystems Awards Genomic Research Grant to St. Jude Children's Research Hospital
News

Applied Biosystems Awards Genomic Research Grant to St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

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Applied Biosystems has announced the recipient of its “What Would You Do With a $10K Genome” grant program. This program was created to inspire new scientific approaches that employ advanced genomic technologies that are now enabling human genomes to be sequenced for as little as $10,000.

Charles Mullighan, M.D., Ph.D., of St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital received the first-prize award at the 10th annual Advances in Genome Biology and Technology meeting in Marco Island, Florida.

Dr. Mullighan, an assistant member in the Department of Pathology at St. Jude, was selected from more than 200 entries based upon his interest in using a next-generation sequencing approach to identify potential new therapeutic opportunities related to acute lymphoblastic leukemia, which is a cancer of white blood cells.

As part of winning the first-prize grant, researchers from Applied Biosystems will work collaboratively with Dr. Mullighan to generate 60 gigabases or 750 million tags of sequencing data for this research project.

Applied Biosystems will also perform all sample processing, data generation, and primary data analysis using the SOLiD 3 System, which is the only commercially available platform in the life science industry to provide a path to a $10,000 genome. The SOLiD 3 System will enable researchers involved in this project to detect structural variation in the genome such as novel single-base changes, or SNPs, large and small insertion/deletions, translocations and copy number variants.
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