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Arabidopsis TOE Proteins Involved in the Regulation of Flowering Time
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Arabidopsis TOE Proteins Involved in the Regulation of Flowering Time

Arabidopsis TOE Proteins Involved in the Regulation of Flowering Time
News

Arabidopsis TOE Proteins Involved in the Regulation of Flowering Time

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Plants flower in an appropriate season to allow sufficient vegetative development and position flower development in favorable environments. In Arabidopsis, CONSTANS (CO) and FLAVIN-BINDING KELCH REPEAT F-BOX1 (FKF1) promote flowering by inducing FLOWER LOCUS T (FT) expression in the long-day afternoon. The CO protein is present in the morning but could not activate FT expression due to unknown negative mechanisms, which prevent premature flowering before the day length reaches a threshold. Here, we report that TARGET OF EAT1 (TOE1) and related proteins interact with the activation domain of CO and CO-like (COL) proteins and inhibit CO activity. TOE1 binds to the FT promoter near the CO-binding site, and reducing TOE function results in a morning peak of the FT mRNA. In addition, TOE1 interacts with the LOV domain of FKF1 and likely interferes with the FKF1-CO interaction, resulting in partial degradation of the CO protein in the afternoon to prevent premature flowering.

The article, Arabidopsis TOE proteins convey a photoperiodic signal to antagonize CONSTANS and regulate flowering time is published in PLOS ONE and is free to access.


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