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Blind Mice Regain Sight After Single Gene Insertion

News   Mar 15, 2019 | Original story from UC Berkeley

 
Blind Mice Regain Sight After Single Gene Insertion

Adeno-associated viruses (AAV) engineered to target specific cells in the retina can be injected directly into the vitreous of the eye to deliver genes more precisely than can be done with wild type AAVs, which have to be injected directly under the retina. UC Berkeley neuroscientists have taken AAVs targeted to ganglion cells, loaded them with a gene for green opsin, and made the normally blind ganglion cells sensitive to light. Credit: John Flannery, UC Berkeley

 
 
 

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